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Zoolife.tv welcomes Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary as Latest Partner from Australia to its Wildlife Streaming Service – World News Report

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Koalas, Dingoes and Platypus take Center Stage through Innovative partnership with Zoolife.tv and their Remote-Control Camera Technology

We’re beyond happy to welcome Lone Pine to Zoolife network; they’ve certainly exceeded requirements of our zoo partners in demonstrating true wildlife conservation in their mission and actions”

— Shawn Blackburn, Director of Partnerships at Zoolife

TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA, August 30, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — Zoolife.tv is excited to welcome Australia’s Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary as the newest partner on their popular online and interactive wildlife streaming service. This is Zoolife’s first partnership effort in Australia, and its second in the Asia Pacific time zone.
Located near Brisbane in Queensland, Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary is the world’s first and largest koala sanctuary, serving as a leader in native animal welfare since 1927. Since its founding, Lone Pine has even managed their own eucalyptus plantation in and around the sanctuary itself because a koala’s staple diet is eucalyptus. The Sanctuary provides ongoing, high-quality care for over 400 animals and wildlife hospital patients, as well as conducting research to support native wildlife conservation.

“At Lone Pine, we want people to not just see Australia’s unique wildlife but meet and experience a true representation of the complex lives of every species in our care,” said Lyndon Discombe, Lone Pine General Manager. “Zoolife’s high definition, remote controlled cameras combined with programming from our Wildlife Education Staff help us provide authentic and interactive experiences that we hope inspire lasting connections between our native wildlife and our visitors wherever they are in the world.”

What sets Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary apart from most other Zoolife.tv partners is that all of the animals featured are native to Australia and their habitats closely mirror their natural environments. What Lone Pine does have in common with all other Zoolife.tv partners is that wildlife conservation is a key part of their mission. They also have a keen interest in helping a global audience enjoy and understand their animals more intimately.

Visitors can access online streams in real time featuring koalas, dingoes, and eventually a platypus each in a carefully constructed habitat consistent with how they would live in the wild. Equipped with 20x optical zoom, Zoolife.tv high-definition cameras are carefully positioned for maximum viewability. Cameras can be controlled by viewers and have the ability to create video clips and photographs of the animals to share with friends or with the broader Zoolife.tv community. Weekly talks hosted by animal experts are always popular and include Q&A’s with zookeepers and education staff.

Viewers will be able to observe natural behaviors like koalas shuffling for their preferred positions among the branches, how they use their two thumbs in their daily activities and how they eventually notch themselves into a tree when it’s time for a nap! It doesn’t take long to go from frenzy to slumber for these adorable creatures, especially since they can sleep between 18-20 hours a day.

The dingo habitat incorporates a high degree of structural complexity with large rocks, trees, undulations and hills, bodies of water, dens and hiding spaces, as well as numerous vantage points and multi-level traversing points. This gives the dingo pack of two females and one male plenty of space to explore and express their natural behaviors.

While cameras are now live in the koala and dingo habitats, Lone Pine is working with Zoolife technicians on a strategy to bring Zoolife.tv’s patent-pending camera technology underwater for the first time where they will introduce a platypus to the Zoolife.tv viewers. Platypuses are mammals but they spend most of their time swimming. As viewers will learn from the Lone Pine Educators, when under water, the platypus uses its sensitive bill to “feel” electricity in its environment.

“We’re beyond happy to welcome Lone Pine onto the Zoolife network; they’ve certainly exceeded requirements of our zoo partners in demonstrating true wildlife conservation in their mission and their actions,” said Shawn Blackburn, Director of Partnerships at Zoolife.tv. “Part of our mission here at Zoolife is to ensure that our revenue sharing program results in an important additional resource in support of Lone Pine’s important conservation work.”

Visitors can access 24/7 streams showcasing their favorite wildlife from zoos around the world using Zoolife.tv’s innovative camera technology. A minimum of 50% of every subscription dollar earned goes back to the zoos and sanctuaries in support of their animal conservation efforts. More information about Zoolife.tv can be found on the Zoolife.tv website.

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About Zoolife.tv

Zoolife.tv is the world’s first live and interactive virtual zoo, streaming live 24/7 from the world’s top accredited zoos, sanctuaries, and rehabilitation centers. Each stream is designed to bring you closer to wildlife and offers innovative ways of learning, protecting and engaging with the animals, from the comfort of one’s home.

Zoolife’s state-of-the-art technology allows users to control the camera from their device, zoom into a tiger’s whiskers, or move the camera around to explore a gorilla’s habitat. Streaming live 24/7, Zoolife features a growing collection of remarkable animal species, daily keeper talks, and interactive Q&As with animal experts for in-depth learning and so much more.

Zoolife values being a force for good. 50% of every dollar goes to wildlife conservation efforts led by our partners. Together, we are building a future where we share a deeper connection to wildlife every day. For more information, please email info@zoolife.tv or visit our website at Zoolife.tv

Gina Milani
Milani Marketing & PR LLC
+1 925-788-6344
gina@milanimarketing.com
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Koalas are good jumpers




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